Advanced Theories of Hypertrophy & Anabolism(Muscle Growth)

Posted: September 5, 2011 in Fitness & health

Exercise increases muscle protein synthesis and plasma levels of Follistatin, Interleukin-5, IGF-1, MGF, HGH, Testosterone, and androgen receptor sensitivity. Anabolic steroids increase follistatin expression.
 
EXERCISE itself seems to be the ultimate KEY to regulating plasma levels of growth factors(and their expression) in the body, which lends credence to the notion that more frequent bouts of exercise will induce greater hypertrophy(and hyperplasia) in a the enhanced athlete. OVETRAINING? No, just UNDER-eating and inadequate resting. 😉
 

You must VARY the type of STIMULUS; heavy weight, light weight, higher rep and lower rep. Remember, every time that you EXERCISE you cause a CASCADE of accute biochemical and hormonal responses that increase hypertrophy. ONLY exercise can induce these changes, and it seems logical that if executed properly, with sufficient feeding and resting, the more you can exercise, the more you can increase muscle protein synthesis, Follistatin levels and expression, IGF-1 levels and expression, interleukin-5 levels and expression, androgen-receptor sensitivity and testosterone-uptake–which equates to signficantly greater hypertrophy.

Biologically speaking, training pretty much CONSTANTLY, throughout the day, in multiple divided increments(bouts of exercise), would produce the maximum hypertrophic response. Therefore, these accute biochemical and hormonal responses that occur after EXERCISE are actually directly proportionate to:

1.) The amount of work performed
2.) The intensity of the work performed
3.) The duration of the work performed

From an evolutionary standpoint, this makes perfect sense. The body must adapt, and it will upregulate, downregulate, increase or decrease functions accordingly, in order to do so. Imagine how muscular a body would become after adapting to such an exercise protocol.

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